THE SEVENTYNINE

Olivers Army - performed at Fishermans Walk park as part of Shake And Stir by the Seventynine an electric band influenced by the songs from the late 1970s and early 1980s. The Seventynine play covers and their own songs with this influence.

Olivers Army - performed at Fishermans Walk park as part of Shake And Stir by the Seventynine an electric band influenced by the songs from the late 1970s and early 1980s. The Seventynine play covers and their own songs with this influence.

Oliver's army was originally performed by Elvis Costello and the Attractions, Elvis wrote this in 1978 on a plane coming back from Belfast. It was the first time he went to the city, and he was shocked to see very young soldiers from the British army walking around with machine guns. The song covers Northern Ireland's troubles, the end of the British empire and life in the army. 

The title is a reference to Oliver Cromwell, leader of the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War against the Royalist army of Charles 1. Among other things, he established what was called The New Model Army, which was the first professional, properly trained and drilled fighting force England had. Costello's song is a general anti-military statement, its main target is the fact that the only real option that the unemployed have is to join the army (British unemployment figures were at an all-time high when he wrote the song in the early '80s). It doesn't have anything particular to do with Cromwell, other than the title.

The piano riff was inspired by Abba's "Dancing Queen." Until the band came up with it, they considered this a B-side and were not planning to put it on the album.